Diagonal

In 2018 Spike Lee said on national TV “Let’s Make America Love Again”

America has suffered and is suffering these days. We can change America: with one powerful idea the unimaginable will become the possible. We can change the course of history right here and right now knowing that what happens in the USA will affect every corner of the planet. “Make America Love Again” is a modern protest song, a new American Anthem for 2020 following on from We Shall Overcome. We are asking you to sing this song, to create your own unique version. We seek justice and equality in 2020, this is our campaign song, A SONG FOR TODAY.

America has suffered and is suffering these days. Yet  – “There is nothing wrong with America that cannot be cured by what is right with America”…Music moves hearts! WE can help to put out the terrible fire that is burning in our country. Make America Love Again is the  song to heal America’s soul in 2020.  It is in the best tradition of political gospel, of peaceful protest. It will touch the hearts of millions who want a better America, especially those who may have chosen another path in previous  times.  We seek justice, decency and kindness. We would like to live in peace, without fear just because of who we are. We are calling for you to sing this song, for  One Million Singers for MALA and 1000 Choirs to sing this song. Together we can make a lot of noise! We can overcome, we can speak to every American, African, European and Asian. ...show more Your voice and your spirit counts for everything. Join us now. 

JOIN OUR CAMPAIGN NOW

Share the love

Diagonal

The 1000 Choirs Project

“A New American Anthem”

Join our campaign for 1000 CHOIRS and one million singers to sing this anthem in 2020.

Welcome to the greatest Gospel Choir Event of 2020. This will be the new American Anthem for change! 2020 is the year to turn things around. You can support us by signing up, by singing and making a video recording of this anthem online on your own or with your choir. Then send it to us. You will be part of a great movement to change America, to change the world, starting in your own home.

FIND OUT MORE

 

Diagonal

Support our campaign

You can support us by signing up, by singing this anthem online on your own or with your choir. This is a song for a choir of all Americans. You can wear the T-shirt and when asked what it means you ask “how would YOU make America love again?”

VISIT OUR ONLINE STORE

Support our campaign, change the world
Diagonal
Diagonal

YOUR COMMENTS

Please leave a comment below.
If you’d like to help, get in touch.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

2 comments for Make America Love Again

  1. Vee Valenti says:

    What is there to say but thank you for this tune. I’m an American and I’m almost ashamed to say it in these times, because these times don’t represent me or the America that gave me hope for the future. This song gives me hope, and hope is so beautiful. It gives me a way to put the horrendous abuse of the promise of this country into context: that this is a country that welcomes anyone to its shores, that it is a beacon to those lost who are lost
    and need protection. America was made for those people, and we are those people. We’ve just lost our memory, and our compass.

    And love is the answer! It’s always the answer to the questions hanging over the future of anything. What am I, what do I stand for and how can I make things better? This song needs to be listened to. It’s like many of the iconic tunes from the days of the war in Vietnam, the protest songs of Dylan, Guthrie and Joan Baez. It’s as beautiful as it’s call to love.

    My country has always strived to forgive itself, to create a perfect Union, to be an example for others to follow. But sadly, we have lost our way. This song speaks to me and for me.
    I love it. And thank you.

  2. Nick Inman says:

    When I watched the video it set me thinking. Can a nation experience love? Love is usually considered a personal thing –intimate, invisible, subjective. It is felt by one person for another person or for an animal or object. People love – but countries? It is difficult to imagine them having emotions and moons, except in some highly metaphorical sense. Was the song meaningless, I wondered? Well meant but not much help? I have a literal mind and I couldn’t help pursuing this: what would it mean for a country to love? I am going to rephrase this question to make it specific. What the title implies, I think, is that love can be a political as well as a personal virtue.
    Which makes me wonder: whatever happened to love as a political virtue and how can we recover it? Not just in America but in the world in general. Did we grow up, out of an old naïveté; or did we grow down into a collective agreement to indulge our animal urges and ignore the difficult business of being apes (apparently) with higher consciousness?

    What, for that matter, has love got to do with politics? Surely politics and love don’t mix. If you want to get on in a political career you don’t waste your time loving people. Fear, division and hate get people worked up enough to vote for you. No one looks strong and decisive by showing love. With one exception: it is okay to love your own powerbase, your supporters, your own country, “the hard working common people”.

    Love does have a lot to do with political systems. Now and then the American system – and other political systems – throws up a candidate who tries to spread love rather than its opposites. I’m not sure if most people see the value in this. If we were wise we would recognise such people and vote for more of them.

    Unfortunately, they are going against the zeitgeist. Several decades ago we (the world) opted to replace old-fashioned religious virtues with the economic virtues of consumerism and globalisation, forces which make everything they touch into inauthentic commodities. Love has become just one such commodity taught to us by series and adverts these days rather than teachers (in the widest sense) and philosophical books. The economic mechanisms of composition divide people and teach them to be selfish and exclusive. Only after you have made billions of dollars that you cannot spend do you start to think about philanthropy. When you are making money, love only gets in the way.
    What, then, is love in a collective, political sense? It must be the following (and more):
    * recognising common destiny. Sometimes this goes with the culture of the nation state; sometimes it breaks the boundaries. If we are to show love for our ailing planet, we cannot confine our love to its patriotic variety.
    * one opposite of cynicism. It is caring. It is a realisation that pessimism and fatalism are futile. There is no point talking about a doomed world beyond saving. To tell the young that things have gone too far, is not an act of reality and honesty, but an attitude of lethargy and resignation. Love does not have to be unrealistic; but it doesn’t have to mean giving into the immense powers that work against it.
    * a constructive force. Building is hard work. Building understanding between communities with closed and frightened minds is difficult, slow work but it must be done. The politicians who undertake this task are not always conspicuous. Mouthing off in a way that foments argument gets much more coverage in the media than the incremental process of bringing enemies towards each other.
    * taking an interest in and caring about strangers; in seeing people beyond your family and circle of friends, as people who you have much (a body, mind, emotions) in common with. It is a refusal to categorize or condemn label or dismiss. recognising the suffering of other people and doing something about it without judging them: offering them healthcare, giving them assistance in difficult times especially when their circumstances of their lives are not of their own making. It is the recognition that if I am born into privilege and the other person not, I have both an opportunity and a responsibility to do what I can for him or her
    * putting people before data, before bureaucracy, before authoritarianism. It is accepting that there is no scientific definition or explanation for a human being or for the emotions they experience, including love.
    * the driving force behind the boring stuff we have to do to get through our lives with as much grace as possible. How we administer our societies and share out their resources. Contributing to local government committee meetings, because someone has to do it.
    * the acknowledgement of every other person’s right to liberty and to equality – in a literal, practical sense – equal to my own
    * an international force, that does not stop at national frontiers.
    * an compromising desire to improve lives. It has to be applied in reality and there are limits to our capacities as individuals and societies, but this does not mean that love should not always be an aspiration to make the world better to the extend that we are able.
    * and, of course, peace. Pragmatically, this can be interpreted as defence or peace-keeping but never invasion or aggression. The military has a difficult job to do in balancing the art of war with the wisdom of preferring reconciliation to conflict, but it can be a force for good given the right political instruction.
    By all this, I mean we must learn to delegate our love to politicians worthy of our trust. Which means, to begin with, that we find and favour politicians capable of this task. Unfortunately, the system discriminates against their success. Instead, those who usually triumph are too often motivated by selfishness, career, power, celebrity, ideology and money – anything but love. That can’t be right. If we get the politicians we deserve – if the politicians reflect their people – then it is up to us to practise political love ourselves, and expect that our representatives understand what we are asking them to do.